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A few questions after my first game.
03-27-2012, 01:50 AM (This post was last modified: 03-27-2012 02:02 AM by gca3020.)
Post: #1
A few questions after my first game.
So I've been pining over this game for a while, but couldn't "justify" the cost until I got myself an iPad. What an idiot I was; this game is worth $8 and more. I took a peek at the upcoming changes, and saw that 1.1.2 will even support the new retina display, so I am on pins and needles for that release!

Just played a "tutorial" game against an easy AI, and thoroughly whollopped (spell-check says this is not a word--I disagree) him in a very long game.

I just used the race the tutorial told me to (Isather I think?) and used the built-in build orders to get a feel for how the game works, so now I need to dive into some custom races and build queues next.

However, I did have a few questions about the game that I'm hoping can be answered here.

1) When a planet goes into hoarding mode, is there a way to see how much production is stockpiled? I've searched around the forum threads for this and could not come up with a satisfactory answer.

2) Assuming I want to dedicate a planet or two to farming, and hopefully produce enough food for my entire empire. Is there a "cost" involved with shipping that food around, or is it basically "free" where food can be produced anywhere and consumed anywhere else without penalty?

EDIT: From the in-game help, the cost to ship food is -1/2 GC/turn. However, now I am curious what is the factor that decides if it would be -1 or -2?

3) I colonized a planet that said it had precious minerals on it. From a practical standpoint, what does this mean to me? More taxes? Higher Production per worker?

EDIT: From the in-game help, planets that are mineral-rich cause each worker to produce extra industry.

4) Speaking of taxes, how is money made? If a planet is set to "economic funding" would I want to have its population set to workers, and have an "industrial" (+production) focus to the planet? Or is it done solely based on population? What is the ideal planet type to generate a lot of revenue?

EDIT: From the in-game help, each colonist (which I assume represents 1million colonists), so the planets that can support the largest population would be the best ones to add the buildings that boost income.

Thanks in advance, and sorry for the newb questions. Some of them are probably called out in the in-game tutorial and I just missed them, but I figured since I was posting to introduce myself anyway, I would take advantage of the community!

EDIT: I'm an idiot, and only read through the "tutorial" portion of the in-game help, not the detailed breakdown of planet types, farming, and credits.
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03-27-2012, 02:11 AM (This post was last modified: 03-27-2012 02:17 AM by Bruin.)
Post: #2
RE: A few questions after my first game.
Here are some semi-complete answers which others can elaborate on with more specific details. And hopefully no needed corrections! Smile
(03-27-2012 01:50 AM)gca3020 Wrote:  1) When a planet goes into hoarding mode, is there a way to see how much production is stockpiled? I've searched around the forum threads for this and could not come up with a satisfactory answer.

I do not think there is. You can check your progress relative to a particular goal which you might understand, such as a more expensive ship, by swapping it into the first item (revealing the amount of time left to complete it) and swapping Economic Hoarding back into the first priority. If you really wanted to you could calculate exact units from there, but I've found you just get a feel for these things over time.

(03-27-2012 01:50 AM)gca3020 Wrote:  2) Assuming I want to dedicate a planet or two to farming, and hopefully produce enough food for my entire empire. Is there a "cost" involved with shipping that food around, or is it basically "free" where food can be produced anywhere and consumed anywhere else without penalty?

It costs money to ship food around to other planets (the exact cost I do not remember). Still, I've generally found that it is better to produce food on planets which are capable of producing it effectively. Much later in the game (based on the racial attributes I usually choose) I sometimes find you can save significant money on some planets by tossing a person into farming, even though that planet may not be a primary farming planet.

"EDIT: From the in-game help, the cost to ship food is -1/2 GC/turn. However, now I am curious what is the factor that decides if it would be -1 or -2?"
The cost is -½ Gold per turn.

(03-27-2012 01:50 AM)gca3020 Wrote:  3) I colonized a planet that said it had precious minerals on it. From a practical standpoint, what does this mean to me? More taxes? Higher Production per worker?

When you colonize a planet the turn summary will describe any special attributes the planet has. If memory serves correctly, Precious Minerals increases the colony's income by +10 GP/turn. Sometimes these bonuses are great, but they have to be combined with the proper planet and the proper circumstances. A farming bonus on a barren planet is not very useful, for example.

(03-27-2012 01:50 AM)gca3020 Wrote:  4) Speaking of taxes, how is money made? If a planet is set to "economic funding" would I want to have its population set to workers, and have an "industrial" (+production) focus to the planet? Or is it done solely based on population? What is the ideal planet type to generate a lot of revenue?

Colonists generate a certain amount of money each turn. This amount of money is adjusted by various racial attributes and some structures. Economic Funding (very important) converts production (I don't know if it is 1=1) into cash. Planets have a mineral level, such as 'Mineral Poor', 'Mineral Abundant', or 'Very Mineral Rich'. This determines productivity on the planet, and thus, a more productive planet can generate more income through Economic Funding, but the most important planets will generally have important responsibilities in your strategy. As far as I know, outside Economic Funding, planetary attributes do not influence the basic income of each population member.

The main things to keep an eye on is food distribution (p.s. a racial food production bonus can be extremely valuable), and the costs of the buildings you apply to planets. For example, you do not want Agent Training Camps where you do not want to produce spies—one or two across your network of planets is usually fine, you do not want farming bonus buildings where you do not farm, you would not want Space Elevators on planets where you do not build enough ships to warrant it, etc.

"EDIT: From the in-game help, each colonist (which I assume represents 1million colonists), so the planets that can support the largest population would be the best ones to add the buildings that boost income."
Yeah, buildings which boost income per colonist are more effective on planets with a larger population. The other income building, Improved Tax Collection, is a flat bonus, so it is good anywhere. That said, if you do happen to research buildings which boost income (in various cases it may be better to research other buildings and depend on Economic Funding), they are good on any planet (as they provide income, rather than take it away) except in cases where limited space for buildings means a more important building would have been a better choice (e.g. research or production bonuses).

(03-27-2012 01:50 AM)gca3020 Wrote:  Thanks in advance, and sorry for the newb questions. Some of them are probably called out in the in-game tutorial and I just missed them, but I figured since I was posting to introduce myself anyway, I would take advantage of the community!

It always seems like people here are happy to help. Smile
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03-27-2012, 02:19 AM (This post was last modified: 03-27-2012 02:20 AM by rocco.)
Post: #3
RE: A few questions after my first game.
Welcome!

Make sure you tap on all of the status info; for instance, the food status on the top bar of the galaxy map, or even the farming/production/research lines at the planet level. All of these provide a line-by-line detailed breakout of what is contributing to their current value.
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03-27-2012, 02:33 AM (This post was last modified: 03-27-2012 02:33 AM by VanderLegion.)
Post: #4
RE: A few questions after my first game.
(03-27-2012 02:11 AM)Bruin Wrote:  
(03-27-2012 01:50 AM)gca3020 Wrote:  2) Assuming I want to dedicate a planet or two to farming, and hopefully produce enough food for my entire empire. Is there a "cost" involved with shipping that food around, or is it basically "free" where food can be produced anywhere and consumed anywhere else without penalty?

It costs money to ship food around to other planets (the exact cost I do not remember). Still, I've generally found that it is better to produce food on planets which are capable of producing it effectively. Much later in the game (based on the racial attributes I usually choose) I sometimes find you can save significant money on some planets by tossing a person into farming, even though that planet may not be a primary farming planet.

"EDIT: From the in-game help, the cost to ship food is -1/2 GC/turn. However, now I am curious what is the factor that decides if it would be -1 or -2?"
The cost is -½ Gold per turn.

As he said, it's one half GP per turn for each unit of food being shipped to another planet. I typically prefer to have breadbox planets that do all my farming and ship it to my other worlds (typically poor mineral terran or gaia planets if I can find em). It also helps immensely if you get hydroponics bay 2 on every planet, that gives you 4 food per turn, so it'll reduce the cost to ship food around, as well as the number of farmers you need, but a not insignificant amount. Also, as he said, throwing 1 or 2 people on farming on a planet can reduce costs as well, mainly if said planet is terran or gaia, or at a double star system (gives +1 food per worker) so they get a decent amount of food out of it.

Quote:
(03-27-2012 01:50 AM)gca3020 Wrote:  3) I colonized a planet that said it had precious minerals on it. From a practical standpoint, what does this mean to me? More taxes? Higher Production per worker?

When you colonize a planet the turn summary will describe any special attributes the planet has. If memory serves correctly, Precious Minerals increases the colony's income by +10 GP/turn. Sometimes these bonuses are great, but they have to be combined with the proper planet and the proper circumstances. A farming bonus on a barren planet is not very useful, for example.

That last part is actually untrue. The farming bonus you can get on planets is Bio-rich Fungi, which is a straight +4 food per turn from that planet, it works whether you have any farming or not, so it's actually quite useful on barren or toxic/radiated planets.

Quote:
(03-27-2012 01:50 AM)gca3020 Wrote:  4) Speaking of taxes, how is money made? If a planet is set to "economic funding" would I want to have its population set to workers, and have an "industrial" (+production) focus to the planet? Or is it done solely based on population? What is the ideal planet type to generate a lot of revenue?

Colonists generate a certain amount of money each turn. This amount of money is adjusted by various racial attributes and some structures. Economic Funding (very important) converts production (I don't know if it is 1=1) into cash. Planets have a mineral level, such as 'Mineral Poor', 'Mineral Abundant', or 'Very Mineral Rich'. This determines productivity on the planet, and thus, a more productive planet can generate more income through Economic Funding, but the most important planets will generally have important responsibilities in your strategy. As far as I know, outside Economic Funding, planetary attributes do not influence the basic income of each population member.

Economic fundings gives half a gp for each point of production the planet produces. Excess food (if you're gaining more food per turn than you have total population) sells of for half a gp per unit of food as well. This can actually come in handy if you have a planet that has excess production and you're short on cash, you can move the extra workers over to food and get some extra income without having to switch to economic funding. I don't do this as often as I used to before 1.1.0 though, since extra production now spills over to the next thing you build instead of being lost.

Also: Welcome to the addiction Smile

GC ID - VanderLegion, GMT-9. Sandbox GC ID (Beta) - VanderLegion
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03-27-2012, 03:46 AM
Post: #5
RE: A few questions after my first game.
Wow, thanks for all the quick replies. I definitely need to work on some of the auto build focuses, because I'm the kind of player who doesn't like to micro-manage a dozen planets or so every turn, and the default build focuses don't seem optimal (Probably a good thing, since it allows a thought-out strategy to win over someone using the defaults).

I would love to be able to see which worlds have hoarded production (and how much) from a glance at the Empire Screen. Perhaps right under the population growth number (+45k) have a line like "Hoarded: 1850".

So if I understand correctly, all worlds generate income based on their population, but Economic Funding is added on top of that by converting production into GC. Farming surplus is also automatically converted into GC, though not as efficiently as a planet set to Economic Funding.

Do planets have a "base" amount of production at all? In other words, if I have a planet with a population of 12, and all 12 are set to farming, is there any added benefit to have the planet set to Economic Funding (or will Economic Hoarding actually horde anything?) I'm at work, and don't have a game in progress to pull up the stat sheets that rocco mentioned to see if it is broken out.

I do have to give huge kudos to the developers for putting out an iOS app that causes me to think more than an app has in a long time. Hopefully after a few more games against the AI, I'll feel comfortable jumping into multiplayer.

Now I just need to try and figure out how spies work ;-)
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03-27-2012, 04:01 AM (This post was last modified: 03-27-2012 04:03 AM by VanderLegion.)
Post: #6
RE: A few questions after my first game.
(03-27-2012 03:46 AM)gca3020 Wrote:  So if I understand correctly, all worlds generate income based on their population, but Economic Funding is added on top of that by converting production into GC. Farming surplus is also automatically converted into GC, though not as efficiently as a planet set to Economic Funding.
Exactly. You gt a base of 1 credit income per population in your empire, so a world with 5 population is automatically generating 5 GC per turn. Then funding and farming surplus are added to that.

Quote:Do planets have a "base" amount of production at all? In other words, if I have a planet with a population of 12, and all 12 are set to farming, is there any added benefit to have the planet set to Economic Funding (or will Economic Hoarding actually horde anything?) I'm at work, and don't have a game in progress to pull up the stat sheets that rocco mentioned to see if it is broken out.
Starting out, no, planets have no base production. Some buildings -Efficient Factories, Robotics Facilities, and Planetary Core Mining - provide a static amount of production per turn, and EF and PCM also provide a bonus to industry per worker. If you have at least Efficient Factories built on a planet, then you can have everyone on farming or research and still get a little bit out of funding or hoarding.

Quote:Now I just need to try and figure out how spies work ;-)

Each offensive spy you have gives you a 1% chance of stealing/sabotaging something. Each defensive spy the opponent has decreases your chance by 1%. If you have spies on both espionage and sabotage, I believe it determines if you did something first based ont he above percentages, then determines which it was after. There's also a chance of killing an enemy offensive spy with your defensive spies, or killing an enemy defensive spy with your offensive spies, no idea how the chances work out for that.

There's several tech that effect spying, one gives a 50% chance of saving a defensive spy that would have otherwise been killed, one decreases the cost of defensive spies by 50% (spies cost 1 GC per turn maintenance normally, if you have repulsive they cost 3 GC per turn. don't remember if charismatic decreases the cost). There's also one that doubles the effectiveness of offensive spies.

Spies can be really good if used well. I had a game that I pretty much stole all the best tech from my opponent instead of having to research it myself since he was researching way faster than me, then went on to use said tech to win. (I was also spending a good 120+ GC per turn maintenance for all of those spies since I was repulsive.)

Repulsive also reduces effectiveness of spies by 20% while charismatic increases effectiveness by 20%. I'm assuming its 20% of whatever your current chance is, so if you have 10 spies for a 10% chance of success, repulsive would drop it down to 8% and charismatic would push it up to 12%.

GC ID - VanderLegion, GMT-9. Sandbox GC ID (Beta) - VanderLegion
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03-27-2012, 04:40 AM
Post: #7
RE: A few questions after my first game.
(03-27-2012 02:33 AM)VanderLegion Wrote:  That last part is actually untrue. The farming bonus you can get on planets is Bio-rich Fungi, which is a straight +4 food per turn from that planet, it works whether you have any farming or not, so it's actually quite useful on barren or toxic/radiated planets.
Thanks! I should have paid more attention. That actually does make it useful on a Barren planet. Before it just perplexed me.
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